OMG UPDATE: Question? Answer.

Updated on Tuesday, April 28

#7157

QUESTION: For a technical analyst, or any analyst or a similar role right out of university, how many paid vacation days do I get?
Can I extend those days (unpaid), if I really need to stay at some place and not get paid for, say, an extra week or two? Is it allowed, frowned upon or worse?
I have never been employed before, and I recently graduated and got an offer, so I have no idea. Thank you!

14 comments

  1. In the private sector, 2 weeks, in the public sector 2 or 3 weeks. In terms of extending those days (unpaid) I would advise against it.

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    1. Would you elaborate on "advise against it"?

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    2. Well, it's a bit unfair, but I think more often than not companies don't generally encourage people taking days off without pay. They don't want the practice to become commonplace. Also, it's a case of creating the right impression and in the corporate world wanting to take extra time off without pay is interpreted as questionable work ethic. Much the same way some companies are started to turn against work from home arrangements. I think you'd have to put in some time and accomplish something noteworthy before you try that.

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  2. "I have never been employed before, and I recently graduated and got an offer, so I have no idea. Thank you!"

    Personally that statement sends chills through my spine. The value of a degree is so grossly overrated it's disgusting imo. No offense OP. I'm happy you found a job, it's just mind-boggling for someone such as myself.

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  3. I don't get it, just because I haven't been employed doesn't mean I'm not good at what I'm doing... So by your logic, I shouldn't be employed because I haven't worked before? So no one should have a job unless they have a job

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    1. Actually with your faulty logic that you just used I would say that education is vastly exaggerated. My question is why have you not been employed yet in your life? If you were not in co-op then why did you not find employment on your own? Were you in university continuously or did you have breaks and just chill? I don't understand how someone could find employment as an analyst with zero experience. Personally, I would short the hell out of that firm.

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  4. Such logic, much intelligence, wow.
    1. there's training for several weeks. 2. I know everything they require me to know (tech knowledge) 3. they even said I might be over qualified. 4. I'm an international student who had to go back for summers, and finding an internship is impossible there. 5. I did work on many projects on my own. 6. Good grades, did a whole lot better than my co-op friends on assignments, exams, projects etc. 7. I beat over 30+ people applying for this position, most of whom I'd presume were coops.
    I'd rather hire a logical person with no experience than someone like you with decades of it.

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    1. But can you see why kids love the taste of cinnamon toast crunch?

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    2. Training... for several weeks... You know absolutely everything they require you to know... You think you're overqualified... Good grades...

      Yeah you're the perfect candidate in your own mind OP. I was actually trying to figure out HR's reasoning for hiring you. Personally, I've started a number of businesses myself in the area and have been involved with hiring for many large corporations in the area. I wouldn't hire you tbh. Logically you're simply not the best candidate for the position. I question the HR's competency for hiring you over the 30+ people who've applied as if they're worse than you we have a huge problem.

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    3. Apologies, the reason why you were hired is because you're an international student. Quotas need to be filled. It has nothing to do with inflated grades, inflated ego, or aptitude.

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  5. You are retarded... By your logic he would never be employed because he wasn't employed before. Also I think he said that interviewers thought he was overqualified.
    Also, the quota thing you mentioned is absolutely dumb. If anything, internationals have a tougher time, because every time they get a work permit, they have to get employer to write a document saying they interviewed a reasonable number of Canadians, before they considered the international student.
    I have a friend who is an international student, so I understand. How was he supposed to get a job if he's from a place that rarely if ever does internships...

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    1. I was hoping someone would pick up on the "logic" aspect of this thread, unfortunately it seems to be beyond OP and your post.

      "He would never be employed because he wasn't employed before." Very weak reasoning, truly. You both assume an analyst is an entry-level position. It's not. If an individual does not have any employment experience, ANY, one would put them into an entry-level position for a time to see how they perform. This could be for six month, a year, whatever is needed depending on that person and resources available. This would be the position I would expect OP to be hired for since they have no relevant, zero employment experience whatsoever. I wasn't claiming, as you tried to make a strawman argument out of, that your not entitled to EMPLOYMENT as a whole because you haven't been employed. I was focusing on what POSITION you were being accepted to, a skill position that requires logically thinking which both OP and 5 have really failed to provide. If you can't understand the difference I suggest you go back for more critical thinking training or a refund on your degree.

      As for the quota it's quite a real item. The only comment I will make on it is that it's legal until it isn't.

      For experience as an international student I have no sympathy. OP has put the onus on others instead of their own person. Why didn't they apply for experience abroad during terms off? Did they need to go back to their home country during times off even if they knew they wouldn't find relevant employment experience? How much did they value this experience? Did they assume that they could pass off not having experience as this was the easier route? Could they not take a term off university then and gain experience elsewhere? No. Sorry. If I was doing the interview I would have explored this further in detail.

      After these thoughts I am curious as to why they were hired especially if they are an international student. Were there not Canadian applicants available? Were there not others who had relevant experience? These projects OP stated to have done what would they have involved? OP's projects were done alone, does this mean they are not a team player? OP was told training only takes a few weeks while other employers train for three to six months, why so short? Etc. etc. How did this happen is my question for the thread.

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  6. Yeah...that's called "unpaid leave" and people only take it in extreme situations. For example, a lady I know took unpaid leave because her son got diagnosed with cancer and as a single mother, only she could take him to appointments. It is not to be used to "extend vacations" or whatnot. I mean technically, I guess you could, but it is extremely frowned upon and could be grounds for a layoff if it was between you and another employee. I don't know what it's like in your home country, but it's this way in Canada/USA/UK/France/Korea from personal experience.

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