OMG UPDATE: Question? Answer.

Updated on Monday, March 2

#6950

QUESTION: I'm in first-year engineering, but I've yet to really feel the traditions on campus, at least within my own year. I have yet to sing Godiva's hymn, have the chance to purple, have any inter-discipline hangouts, or chill at POETS (seeing how only upper years are there). I've signed up to be a Big, and I'm stoked for that. I would like to be EdCom in the future, but I'm not sure if you need to be involved with EngSoc before doing so. EngSoc is too political and general for me, so I prefer my discipline's groups. Do traditions really become a thing for engineers on campus? I would like to experience them, but it seems no one is interested.

11 comments

  1. Unfortunately I think Ull find only the engsoc crew mostly participate in the traditions.
    But you're right. That crowd is a cest pool.

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  2. I'm in fourth year engineering and I personally have no desire to experience any of those things you've mentioned. I'm not sure if you realize, and I hate to generalize, but if you talk to people outside of engineering you realize that engineering students have a reputation of being arrogant and only parties among themselves, and during those said parties they only drink. The first thing the school does is encourage this sort of mentality through orientation week like engineering chants based off of godiva's hymn.

    That being said, I don't think this is a bad way of having fun (props to you for signing up to be a Big). If it works for you and that's what you want, go for it. But keep in mind that there are other things that you can do for fun that's not related to engineering. Participate in clubs, organize and participate in socials, make friends outside of engineering. That way you will graduate as a well-rounded individual rather than a typical engineer.

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  3. Like 2 said, there's plenty of these "traditional" activities going on but they're mostly drinking-based. BOAT racing (chug down cheap flat beer starting at noon), Dusted events (who can spend the most money at a bar with only engineers in it), etc. Eng play, TalEng, and a few other events are an exception to that and can be very fun.

    My advice is to go outside engineering. Diversifying to other faculties (for friends and activities) really gives you a different perspective when you go back to engineering events.

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    1. Dusted isn't about spending the most money, it's about completely drying out a pub in a small town.

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    2. Drink Unsuspecting Small Town Establishment Dry

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    3. I know what it stands for. The only way to drink them dry though is to spend a craptonne of money though. I went to one DUSTED at a local open mic night which was a lot of fun. We got to dance and stuff. The other one I went to was just drinking for hours. Would rather actually party.

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  4. I'm in the same boat as 2 and 3. Sometimes I am embarrassed by the grad events being organized by EngSoc - an event at Roxanne's? seriously? EngSoc always plans the manliest of events, making females even more uncomfortable than they already are.

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    1. Strictly speaking, Gradcomm is not affiliated with EngSoc; its an unofficial group of engineering students. Obviously there is significant overlap between the participants in both groups, but don't think that the the Engineering Society sponsors any drinking-related events, or Disorientation Week events.

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    2. You VOTE on the committee that runs the events, if you don't like the events (and by extension, the people who planned the event), you can always vote for someone who represents your ideals, or run for yourself. For better or for worse, the reason there is a lot of overlap between engsoc and gradcom is because they are the students who are not afraid to put themselves out there (for better or for worse).

      Regarding the engsoc "crew" in general, its not like they are exclusive of other people, or that they are bad people in general. They tend to be extroverted, which can be off-putting to some people, but I've never had any particularly negative experiences with anyone in engsoc, aside from a few jokes that crossed the line when people tried too hard to be funny. I'm not really part of that crowd, but I've never once been discouraged from joining/attending their events, including official socials and unofficial parties.

      That being said, its ridiculous they still go to roxannes every year. I chose to vote with my dollars and abstain from that particular event.

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  5. I would just stay away from all the engsoc/engineering stuff. They're generally pretty eccentric people. If you want to meet people from other faculties, just go to parties and join clubs.

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  6. 3rd year engineer here. Sorry in advance for the paragraphs.

    First off, Godiva's Hymn (not the PG version that we teach you in orientation week, obviously) is primarily a drinking song, so you will hear it at bars where there are lots of engineers (ie. a DUSTED or at any gathering of inter-school engineers, such as when Mac or U of T meets up with us). It is also recited in chant form at lots of major eng events (orientation week being a main spot but other rowdy events might also be a good environment for impromptu chanting). The other thing about Godiva's Hymn is that it is call and answer, so if you are upset that you don't hear it often, you can always come to an event and start it yourself with "who are we?".

    Secondly, purpling mainly just happens during orientation week as well (as a Big you will have the chance to purple!) but sometimes EngSoc organizes a charity purpling event. The thing about purpling is that while it's easiest for EngSoc to organize (they've mixed purple dye a million times) but you are also totally within your right to buy gentian violet and make a batch yourself.

    Hanging out in POETS is also totally up to you. It might have a lot of upper years in it, but why would that make you feel like you can't also use the space? There are plenty of seats to go around (except for the rare time during peak hours) but it's not like you aren't a paying member of EngSoc, you're entitled to use those facilities the same as anyone else, and if anyone makes you feel uncomfortable to use it, you can report them (an inclusivity policy was passed by EngSoc to make the space safe). You have literally no one to blame but yourself for this one.

    In regards to EngSoc being too political and general, I'd argue that that's their job, to represent students on issues and to try to appeal to the masses. That being said they tend to offer something for everyone, whether that be the discount program or the exam bank or the printing/binding services. Even the main events themselves are super diverse and are never alcohol-focused, as in you'll never find a 19+ EngSoc event (those events are run by Gradcomm which is not affiliated with EngSoc). The environment surrounding EngSoc has also become less and less toxic over the years, and it's actually really different than it was when I was a frosh a couple years ago, in regards to the "clique" culture. If you gave EngSoc a chance and found something that suited your interests you might have an easier time finding people who would want to help you organize traditional events, like purpling. It's just ironic that in one breath you're rejecting the organization altogether but in the other you want more spirited and involved people to organize things for you.

    Also, EngSoc and FOC (orientation committee aka the people in charge of frosh week) are not related. You do not have to be involved in one to get a position you want in the other, such as Edcom. That being said, your post makes it seem like you are quick to make assumptions and don't take charge of making changes that you want to see, which would hinder you as you want to move up as a leader. This is coming from a person who has been Edcom.

    I hope you find something that works for you, whether that be what other's have said and moving away from Engineering, or staying in the faculty and giving the upper year "EngSoc people" another chance. Good luck in the next 4 years.

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