OMG UPDATE: Question? Answer.

Updated on Thursday, November 6

#6563

QUESTION: This questions is more for people who are over 21ish but younger people can answer it as well. Looking back at how your parents raised you, what is the one thing you are the most thankful about (opportunity/risk/forgiveness/acceptance. It can be anything) and what is one thing you think they could have done better?

14 comments

  1. Thankful for teaching me how to be self-reliant. They could not have been shitty parents as a whole though.

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  2. Their openness and how nonjudgmental they were. I have the type of parents who taught me to have a good head on my shoulders, but at the same time if I fucked up they wouldn't judge me for it. I can talk to them about anything and it's great.

    Done better is hard. I think of them ad pretty great parents.

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  3. Always treat other people the way you'd want them to treat you. I don't know about done better... Had awesome parents.

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  4. They encourages us to have jobs and pay for our own stuff from a young age (I started babysitting at 11 and have always had work since)...;probably cuz we didn't have much money. But whateves - I am good with money now and have an awesome resume.

    My mom could have been less manipulative when it came to my social life.

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  5. When life gets difficult, step the F up. My parents were the hard-working immigrant type and taught me to not complain when things were hard, but to find a way to succeed.

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  6. My parents are hustlas from the hood. I learned to get rich or die tryin

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  7. My parents were teenagers when I was born, and my dad was an undergrad student when I began to learn how to read and write. He'd show me his textbooks and we'd do homework together. I can only imagine how difficult it must have been to juggle university and parenting, both time and money-wise, but he never, ever became irritated at my 800 questions a minute and would explain physics concepts to me as a child whenever I'd point at a graph or something he was working on. He was never too busy for me, and my questions never dismissed as unimportant or a child being annoying. He taught me that everyone deserves respect, and to have a positive outlook in the shittiest of circumstances.

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  8. My parents raised me and always encouraged me to try things out. They encouraged me to do well in school and also I was always encouraged to be transparent with them. A lot of times, my opinion and their opinions did clash but we never fell apart as a family. We knew we would always be there for each other:). I am independent and have a job now! Need to start studying for grad school:(

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  9. When I was a teenager my parents were really open about their past drug experimentation and general rebelliousness. It promoted a healthy discourse and helped me contextualize my own experiences. They taught me how to safely break the rules and let me know that if I ever got myself into real trouble that they'd be there for me. So when I was drunk and stoned and having a panic attack at 3am on a -30° night at a party across fucking town last winter, I didn't hesitate to call them for help. They picked me and my friends up and drove us all home, no questions asked.

    Something they could have done better? Not left me alone so much. I was a very responsible kid, so when I was about 10 they trusted me to take care of myself for a few hours every day. Within a couple years, they trusted me alone most of the time. (Nothing neglectful, just lonely.) Just because I could take care of myself, doesn't mean I should have had to at that age.

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  10. I'm thankful for them pushing me to get a job in high school, and teaching me how to properly save and manage my money. Thanks to them, I am on track to graduate debt-free (with no handouts from them). What they could have done better: not moved so frequently (and unnecessarily) when I was a child. Going to 3 schools in 3 years in 3 different cities is not good for children; they need stability. To this day I have a hard time making/keeping friends because I lost them so frequently when I was younger.

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  11. They never imposed stupid rules. If I asked why I couldn't do something, they explained their reasoning, and usually that was enough for me. It was rare for them to say it is a rule because they said so and not offer further explanation. This changed as I grew older to them simply telling me their view on the situation so that I could make my own mind up. I still go to them for advice for lots of things that I want an adults opinion on because I know they will give their honest opinion. Most recently it has been about what car to buy. They gave me their view on what a car should have, and it almost matched perfectly with what I had already picked out. Their main points were: needs to have lots of power, classy, and AWD. I picked the Subaru WRX STI, so not the most classy car, but once I get stage 2, it will rip up the road. They also taught me to drive fast, which is great.

    They could have played more board games with me. They stopped after they realized I could control the dice because I would roll the exact number I needed, every time. I lost my touch because I haven't played in a long time, but I found a group of friends that likes to play board games, so it is coming back to me.

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  12. for my Dad, i'm grateful for his commitment to his family. though he wasn't around as much as some other parents, he did, and still does, work 14 hour days 6 and sometimes 7 days a week, at an insanely stressful job. he does it because he wants the best for his family. and even though he'd sometimes only get 5 hours of sleep, he'd drive me to ski races at 6am on weekends, help me with math homework, and come to all my choir concerts. he is truly the most motivated, strongest person i know.

    for my Mom, i'm thankful for her never ending love and emotional support. there was never a single moment in my life where i ever doubted that my family loved and supported me unconditionally. raising three kids (essentially alone, since my dad worked so much), as well as working full time is nothing short of amazing. also, her early realization that i had aspergers, and subsequent mission to help me learn the necessary coping mechanisms, is what allowed me to become the confident, outgoing, person i am today. dealing with a child on the autism spectrum is exhausting, but not only did she rise to the challenge, she also parented both my siblings with just as much attention and love.

    in short, my parents are amazing people. i really truly won the genetic lottery.

    the only thing they could have done better, is encourage my dad to work less. having both parents around more often would have taken the stress off of my mom, and allowed my dad to become more involved in discipline (since my mom is often a permissive parent), as well as family life in general.

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  13. I am so grateful to my mom for never buying junk food, as I have relatively healthy eating habits now. They also didn't spoil me, which really helped me handle my finances very well.

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  14. They beat the **** out of me to make me study harder. I hated them for that, but now I also have good study habits and good grades.

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