OMG UPDATE: Question? Answer.

Updated on Monday, July 7

#6794

QUESTION: Where is a cheap place you can go to get organic and healthy foods?

16 comments

  1. - Cheap
    - Organic




    Pick one

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  2. The Kitchener Farmer's Market isn't too bad for prices and they have some organic produce.

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  3. Just eat nor.al food like everyone else ya hippy

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  4. I believe it's called McDonald's. :)

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  5. Healthy foods and more does student days every wednesday. Follow "a student guide to healthy eating" on Facebook, which will post about these kinds of things.

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  6. All food is organic.

    Now if you are talking about the hippie BS definition of organic don't waste your money because there is nothing inherently different about it other than being farmed in a less efficient way.

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    Replies
    1. You are confusing the industry definition of "organic" with a biological definition of organic. Not the same thing.

      As for hippie BS... I would agree with you that certified organic food is farmed, perhaps, less efficiently on a production per acre or production per dollar input measurement. However, simply producing food "efficiently" is an economic measure of food production, and not a human one. Properly grown and distributed organic food, as opposed to organic food grown by large agribusinesses that masquerades as "organic", is better in the long run for everyone.

      If OP is looking for healthy food, try buying local instead of imported organic. The St. Jacob's Farmer's Market is a good place for this, but there are some local food stores in the KW area that are good too. I think that Sobey's and Zehr's both carry Blue Goose brand meat products that are variously organic/humane/non-GMO, etc., which are also good.

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    2. 6.a --> Yeah, no, if humans had not been modifying their crops, developing more efficient agriculture techniques, etc. then we would not have developed so far.

      I would have to pull up the article, but the gist of it was that with modern agriculture techniques, seeds, and basic equipment we can easily feed the whole world population. With the "organic" methods the came cannot be said.

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    3. What is the "organic" method? Thought it was just no pesticides, hormones and all that (sorry, don't want to google it)

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    4. @6c, the "organic" method varies by whatever national organic code a grower operates under, as well as whichever independent certifier they work with (there are many, all supposedly compliant with the national organic code but which some differences). Most people think organic simply means no pesticides, no antibiotics, no hormones, and no yield, as many conventional farmers would add. This is not entirely true. There is a growing number of organic certified inputs, from fertilizers to pesticides. The difference is that they are not derived from petro-chemicals or are non-persistent in the environment. However, many purists (myself included) feel that a truly sustainable, "organic" agriculture requires no inputs whatsoever. Another aspect of organic codes is that raw human sewage may not be applied to crops, as it regularly is in many conventional farms. Animals must also be allowed to engage in natural behaviours (ie., not be treated merely as a machine to produce milk, meat, eggs, etc.), and cannot be penned up or kept indoors permanently.

      The biggest myth about "organic" growing is that is does not produce enough food for the world. Some organic growers have higher yields than their conventional neighbours, some lower. Like everything else, there are better or worse organic growers, and results are varied. However, as 6b proves, many people fall victim to the agri-industrial myth that genetically modified crops and high-input chemical farming are required to feed the world. The truth is that we already produce a massive amount of food, enough to feed the entire world, but do to politics and capitalism, we do not distribute food to those who need it. It's like the Irish potato famine: it is true that the Irish potato crop failed, but there was lots of food produced in Ireland at the time. The English simply didn't give them any, because the other staple crop (wheat) was more valuable, so it was exported to England for rich people, leaving the Irish to starve. Same with famine in Africa. Local farmers are encouraged to grow high-value crops like cotton (which requires a massive amount of pesticides) that are exported to America for consumer goods. The African farmers are not paid enough to BUY food that is imported from America (mostly wheat, which is not a food that many non-Europeans eat anyway), and they no longer GROW their own food because they are growing a high-value export crop. This is just a simple examination of the problem, but it is more or less the sum of it.

      I encourage 6b to consult some more enlightened literature and resist becoming a technological optimist. And sorry for the rant.

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  7. st. jacobs farmer's market

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  8. "organic" food is a scam, it's not healthier but it is more expensive...

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  9. If you have the patience and the space for it, grow it yourself? o.O

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  10. Kitchener Farmers Market seems reasonable. As for the general merits of organic food, I'd recommend these two links from someone that actually seems to be somewhat knowledgeable about nutrition:

    http://summertomato.com/is-organic-food-really-better/
    http://summertomato.com/organic-versus-conventional-food/

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