OMG UPDATE: Question? Answer.

Updated on Tuesday, May 20

#6528

QUESTION: I'm very new to the politics system in Canada. I never really bothered with it but I'd like to vote this year. If you want to vote for the liberals/conservatives, who exactly do you vote for in KW? How does it all work?!

3 comments

  1. Canada has a three level federal system (federal, provincial, municipal). This upcoming election is for the province of Ontario.
    You can find your electoral district and voting station here: http://fyed.elections.on.ca/fyed/en/form_page_en.jsp

    Each riding will have a 'winner' (person with the largest % of the riding vote). This person now has a seat in the Ontario legislative house. Which ever party gets the most seats in total (ie - whichever party wins the most ridings) forms the Ontario Government. If the opposing parties make up more of the house combined than the leading government, it is a minority government. This means the Government needs the the other parties to vote with them to continue to run Government (so their bills pass with a majority house vote). We are in a minority government now, and the NDPs decided not to support the Liberal budget - triggering an election. If the Government has more seats than all of the opposition seats combined, it is a majority government and they theoretically have a lot more power because they don't need the other parties to agree with them.

    Provincial government is responsible for things like education, health care, transit, taxes, and provincial economic development.
    Federal is responsible for immigration, the Charter, criminal code, national transportation, trade, security etc.
    Municipal is responsible for water, roads, waste, property taxes and the like.

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    Replies
    1. Doesn't that mean having a minority government is always better?
      Because then we are not giving the government tooooo much power.

      (i'm genuinely asking to learn)

      Thanks in advance!

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    2. Not always. A minority government can also slow processes down. Some major programs were put through in majority governments such as our Charter of Rights and Freedoms, that may have otherwise been slowed down or stopped by party politics (ie - power plays and trying to trigger an election).

      I personally prefer a minority government as it forces collaboration and consideration of other groups, but it can really slow things down. For example, think of all the bills that were going to be on the table in Ontario, but now have to be scratched due to an election triggered by a minority government not being able to pass its budget? All those bills start back at square 1 once the election is over (or disappear forever).

      Both have their plus and minuses, so maybe the best thing is to simply have a majority every once and a while to get things done.

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