OMG UPDATE: Question? Answer.

Updated on Friday, April 11

#6308

QUESTION: Is there a men's issues club on campus?

12 comments

  1. i see what u did there

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  2. fuckin women hater.. men don't have issues, stop detracting from the real issue!

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  3. No there isn't a MRA club. Feel free to start one. You'll probably have some interest.

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    1. I think OP means a safespace for men to discuss personal issues.

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  4. ye, iz called Grow-a-Pair homie

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  5. I'm not aware of one that exists. You could probably start one.

    I'd be pretty careful though. The vast majority of the time, these "men's rights awareness" orgs aren't really about real human rights issues but an echo chamber for first world problems that (predominantly white) men are experiencing. Academics consider this the classic response to the loss of privilege that is slowly occurring for these guys occupying the highest echelons of society. Lots of these examples include "men get screwed in a divorce financially" (because apparently a stay-at-home wife's work for the past n years of the relationship has absolutely no financial value and she should not be entitled to anything despite providing full-time unpaid support), lash back against a very tiny minority of extreme feminists who claim rape of men isn't rape (it is, and the vast majority of progressives will support you and agree this is a gender issue and it isn't one worth discussing in the way flat earth theorists are not worth engaging), lash back against affirmative action, defined in this case as active monetary/policy support of disadvantaged minorities, because it affects certain men as individuals (this view fails to acknowledge systemic discrimination as a problem that needs to be resolved), etc...

    I'm not saying that men's issues aren't a thing. They definitely are. However, in the vast majority of cases, "men's issues" groups usually mean "white men's issues" and are used to derail conversations about larger, more widespread issues that affect marginalized groups. I think men's issues needs to be part of the broader dialogue of "gender issues"; otherwise, it appears as an equal counterpart to "women's issues", which frankly is a false equivalence; women's issues are both much more harmful to the individual AND women as a group, and such issues, in particular sexual violence, are much more widespread.

    If you're not promoting this to troll, good luck. I think there's a lot of great content to talk about; in particular, custody cases, prison reform, and sexual perceptions of men.

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    1. Thank you. You're the type of person I expect to meet at a university.

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    2. @5, I really want to get to know you as a person. You sound like how I do myself in my head, and a lot more articulate.

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    3. ^ practice. Reading. A lot of it. I've put a lot of time and effort into studying the issues and eventually the arguments start to flow. Being able to put words to how something feels wrong is really empowering.

      I'm hiding behind anonymity so I can avoid the death threats, rape threats, and harassment that tend to come with being a woman "internet feminist". Maybe we'll run into each other eventually.

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  6. Recent evidence suggest that when sexual assaults that take place in prison are accounted for, more men are sexually assaulted each year than women, FYI.

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    1. That is a separate issue. Men who are already deemed to be morally unsound and are places in an environment that enables systematic violence is different than civilized society where people are expected to live out their daily lives free from the violence that we try to keep contained within prisons.

      Yes, prison reform needs to happen, and measures need to be taken. But you can't equate that issue with rape that happens outside of prisons.

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