OMG UPDATE: Question? Answer.

Updated on Tuesday, April 8

#6265

QUESTION: Anyone in science planning on going to law school after undergrad?? Is it a good idea to stay in science or should I switch into an easier program so I can have a high GPA?

5 comments

  1. I'm an Arts student who also plans to go to law school.

    Basically, if you can average A- (80%+) then you shouldn't have to worry about average. If you can't, but you're capable of a really good LSAT score (170+) then you're still fine (there's a free sample LSAT on their website which could give you some idea, if you haven't taken it yet). If neither of those things are true, then I might recommend switching. However, law schools will be more lenient if they can see that you're from a more difficult program, so I wouldn't suggest rushing into it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The only Canadian law school to take into consideration one's undergrad program is UofT. They consider it based on which undergrads have excelled in their JD program. If OP truly wants law school the sad truth is that cGPA trumps all. It is more important than the LSAT, and far more important than undergrad program, extra curricular involvement, volunteering, letters, personal statement, etc.

      OP you need to convert your grades to OMSAS 4.0 scale (http://www.ouac.on.ca/docs/omsas/c_omsas_b.pdf). Convert each individual grade and then average them. The Canadian medians are roughly ~3.6 cGPA and 162 LSAT for admission. Calculate your cGPA and you'll see where you stand.

      In regards to practice LSAT/PrepTests, the first one will show you where your natural abilities lie, but do not use it as an indicator of whether law is for you. Most people perform terribly on their first diagnostic test. Your score will increase with serious prep. I myself scored 17 points higher on my LSAT than my first PrepTest.

      Source: I'm an Arts student who has been admitted to 4 Canadian law schools.

      Delete
  2. The LSAT isn't nearly as important as it is in the US. You'll still need 160+ (80th percentile) with a very good GPA. A stellar LSAT won't save an abysmal GPA like it will in the states, i.e., a 170 isn't going to get you in with a sub 3.0/4 GPA (low to mid 70s).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This really depends on the school and what they weight more. I would check out the forum to get a better idea: http://lawstudents.ca/forums/

      Delete
    2. 2 here, I frequent lawstudents religiously and most Canadian law school weigh GPA more than LSAT. Some schools have GPA drop systems (UBC, UVic, UofM, UNB), Some look at last 2 years (Alberta, Calgary), some have preference for last 2 (Western, Queen's), UofT does best 3 years, and the rest (Windsor, Ottawa, Osgoode) are cGPA. Windsor is quite honestly a crapshoot though. The Ontario schools are GPA focused. Ottawa lets in some pretty mediocre LSAT scores, but not low cGPA. Osgoode and UofT barely touche anything sub 3.6 cGPA. Ontario schools are favourable to reverse splitters (high GPA, low LSAT) and by low LSAT I mean sub 160. It's a lot easier to get in with 3.7/157 than 2.8/171.

      Don't know about TRU, Dal, USask, Lakehead, McGill, or Moncton.

      Delete