OMG UPDATE: Question? Answer.

Updated on Wednesday, January 29

#5846

QUESTION: So I failed in engineering, twice. As a matter of fact I'm not allowed to continue in engineering. I still want to continue in engineering though and I'm looking at transferring to another university. What are my chances that I get accepted elsewhere. Also, any suggestions where I should apply?

18 comments

  1. Perhaps take a hint. Engineering may not be for you. You could always go into business as they accept anyone with a heartbeat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. MANAGEMENT ENGINEERING!!!

      Delete
  2. Why do you want to continue with something you are clearly not cut out for? Do yourself a favour and switch to something you are actually good at.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe engineering is really OP's passion but they may have had difficult situations in their personal life that caused them to fail twice. If this is the case, then I think OP should definitely try again.

      Delete
    2. You don't really find out what engineering is until your 5th and 6th work terms. It's not really what they market it as to first years. One cannot really have a passion for this stuff because one just doesn't know what it is yet.

      Delete
  3. My advice (and this is not condescension, this is real) is to go to one of the technical colleges (Mohawk, Niagara, Sheridan, etc) and study in the 2 or 3 year technician courses. My brother did this, learned a lot of really valuable skills (I'm an ECE PhD student; he did ECE at community college level) and has a great, high paying, challenging job. I think the colleges offer more academic support, and also, they have bridging programs at the end for if you want to get a degree. I know that you can do a technician diploma (3 year) at Mohawk and then transfer to McMaster. Check it out! Seriously. The colleges are great and seriously underrated.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ^ I second this. Technical diplomas are seriously overlooked. Universities are not the only options for people with a technical interest. In fact, college is probably a better option for most people.

      Delete
    2. I am not OP but I would like to thank you for the awesome advice. Very useful and informative. +1

      Delete
    3. 100% agree. I went to Conestoga for a few years and LOVED it. Smaller classes, more one on one time with your teachers, excellent support services. And tech diplomas really do hold a lot of weight when employers are looking for candidates.

      Delete
  4. Ryerson perhaps. Good luck.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I hate to say this but I don't think universities allow for transfers below a minimum grade. I was in a similar situation and I couldn't transfer because my grades were so bad and they required like a 60-70% from your last school and you have to disclose all your marks. The college idea seems a good way to go. Seriously, you should look into some of them because some of them could lead you to the same field that you were looking to enter if you had your engineering degree.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Well first you should really reflect on what caused you to fail because unless you address that, you're not going to succeed regardless of where you're studying.

    ReplyDelete
  7. As an engineering alumni, I have to give you some advice.

    It has been my experience and my observations that engineers hate to fail. Every failure is unacceptable, and they cannot really move past it until they overcome their failures.

    However, "failure" is just one perspective on what happened. It may be in your best interest to change your view on what happened to think of this as an opportunity.

    Over the years you've likely tunnel visioned on engineering, but now that it's off the plate, you can expand your vision and explore other options. Take some time, really take a few months, to revisit what it was you originally applied for, or what types of courses or extracurricular experiences you enjoyed, and consider switching programs / schools.

    Perhaps you could also make an appointment with CECA to do a MyersBriggs / Strong Interest Inventory assessment to help you explore what other career options you have an aptitude for. They're given at a highly discounted rate while you're on campus.

    All the best OP

    ReplyDelete
  8. OP here.
    I'm an INTP.
    I did take those tests and I only learned that I actually am in the right field. Similar recommendations are career in architecture or computer developer and everything closely related in addition to designer and such.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. #7 here.

      I'm glad to hear you were so proactive already. I don't really have more advice for you. But I'll say the two following things.

      1) Maybe you should look at some of the careers options beyond engineering and very similar fields.

      2) I don't know you personally so take it all as advice from a complete stranger, but maybe you're just not ready for University in the way you need to be. It might be best if you took a while off and did something completely different and developed different sets of skills. Work for a while and try to support yourself with a more 'common' job, or if you have the means and desire, spend a few months travelling. And if you still desire to do university then you can always apply as a 'mature student' in the future.

      Delete
    2. Err... I meant 'mature student' in terms of the check-box/application form you would use to re-apply in the future. I did not intend to imply that you are currently immature.

      Delete
  9. I actually did spend 6 months prior to my 2nd attempt at university and even traveled a bit- cleared my head and was genuinely ready for university and the setting.
    Other than engineering I'm looking at industrial Design. It's pretty different, but something I think I'll be better at. But I was always interested in the bionics industry and the best way through is with an engineering degree.
    I hate feeling so stuck and helpless while everyone I know is getting ahead. I know it sound a little stupid, but there is no denying that's how it is.
    Anyhow, thank you for your advice #7.

    ReplyDelete